FAQs

1. What is the importance of this portrait?
2. Who is Sir Anthony van Dyck?
3. Who is the sitter?
4. Why was the portrait selected to be featured in the Jeppson Idea Lab?
5. Why did the Worcester Art Museum become involved with KMSKA? (Why did the Worcester Art Museum undertake this conservation project?)
6. What major discoveries were found during the conservation process of the painting?
7. What became noticeable post-cleaning that was not immediately noticeable before treatment began?
8. What will happen with this portrait when the Jeppson Idea Lab installation ends?

Welcome to FAQs!

Please choose a question from the left.

1. What is the importance of this portrait?

This work, by one of the most significant portraitists in the history of art, still remains little known. The recent treatment, as well as the discovery of the date, reveal the work to be a sensitive and intelligent likeness and an important early work by the artist.

For more information read Chapter 1

2. Who is Sir Anthony van Dyck?

Van Dyck was one of the most sought after artists in the 1600s, an incredibly successful and hard-working painter, printmaker, teacher, and courtier. His remarkably versatile output ranged from portraits to pictures of history, myth, and religion, as well as hundreds of drawings. He eventually ran a large studio, which kept his productivity high, and served at the court of King Charles I of England.

For more information read Chapter 1

3. Who is the sitter?

We have no idea! Given the date, he was probably from Antwerp, where Van Dyck lived at the time. Few sitters from this early period have been identified, although they are likely Antwerp elite and artist colleagues.

For more information read Chapter 1

4. Why was the portrait selected to be featured in the Jeppson Idea Lab?

This painting underwent a major conservation treatment, and we wanted to feature the extensive research and restoration by our former Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Paintings Conservation, Matthew Cushman.

For more information read Chapter 5

5. How did the Worcester Art Museum become involved with KMSKA? (Why did the Worcester Art Museum undertake this conservation project?)

The museum in Antwerp is closed for major renovations, and WAM's director, Matthias Waschek, developed a partnership, bringing the Van Dyck here on long-term loan for treatment and display.

6. What major discoveries were found during the conservation process of the painting?

Two inscriptions were found, one deciphered to reveal the painting's date.

For more information read Chapter 4

7. What became noticeable post-cleaning that was not immediately noticeable before treatment began?

The incredibly sensitive way the face has been painted, the sense of atmosphere around the sitter, and the volume of his body all returned following the cleaning. The cleaning also has made more sense of the changes to the background and costume made by a later artist.

For more information read Chapter 5

8. What will happen with this portrait when the Jeppson Idea Lab installation ends?

We have the painting on loan for several more years, and it will join the [remastered] galleries downstairs, to live alongside other Dutch and Flemish paintings from the 1600s.

For more information visit [remastered]

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