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  • Going, Going, Gone! Find Something Fantastic at Worcester Art Museum Auction!

    WORCESTER, MASS., APRIL 28, 1999 - Up to 300 people are expected to bid on "fantastic finds" at the Worcester Art Museum's Gala Auction '99, on May 22, from 6-10:00 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Worcester. The last of its type before 2002, the auction includes an elegant buffet dinner, several silent auction tables, and a live auction with Marc B. Porter of Christie's, New York serving as auctioneer.

    More than 250 "fantastic finds" from the affordable to the extravagant will be up for bid. Valued from under $50 to more than $7,000, auction items include: antiques; rugs; furniture; creative home items; jewelry; art works; a tennis match with basketball great Bob Cousy; and wonderful vacation destinations such as a week at a Dude Ranch in Montana, a week in Budapest, a two-night stay in the famed Olde Pink House in Savannah (as featured in the novel Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil), a week at a luxurious penthouse in Florida, and many more items too numerous to list.

    The Museum held its first auction in 1969 to raise funds for general operating expenses, and has been running one every three years since then. The 1996 auction raised $84,000. "Our goal this year is $97,000," says Auction Co-Chair Helen Herold of Helen Herold Interiors. "We started collecting items as early as last September, and are grateful to the people who have stepped forward by contributing many unique and valuable objects. We are also grateful to Marc Porter of Christie's, New York for donating his time as auctioneer for this event. I'm sure everyone who attends will remember this auction as an exciting night on the town."

    Mark Shelton, director of Public Affairs at UMass Memorial Health Care, co-chairs this year's auction with Herold. Both are members of the Worcester Art Museum's Members' Council, which organizes this triennial event. "We are very thankful to the Members' Council for providing the Museum with their time and talent to make this event a success," says Marillyn Earley, the Museum's director of Development.

    Don your evening attire and enjoy this festive night out. Cocktails and silent auction bidding begin at 6:00 p.m. followed by an elegant buffet dinner at 7:30 p.m. The live auction begins at 8:30 p.m.

    Tickets cost $60.00 per person and must be purchased in advance. Buy your tickets today then see if the gavel comes down on your side! To order tickets, contact Joan Demma, Auction Coordinator, at 508.799.4406, x3127, or joandemma@worcesterart.org.

    Museum Background

    Opened to the public in 1898, the Worcester Art Museum is the second largest art museum in New England. Its exceptional 35,000-piece collection of paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, photography, prints and drawings is displayed in 36 galleries and spans 5,000 years of art and culture, ranging from Egyptian antiquities and Roman mosaics to Impressionist paintings and contemporary art. Throughout its first century, the Worcester Art Museum proved itself a pioneer: the first American museum to purchase work by Claude Monet (1910) and Paul Gauguin (1921); the first museum to bring a medieval building to America (1927); a sponsor of the first major excavation at Antioch, one of the four great cities of ancient Rome (1932); the first museum to create an Art All-State program for high school artists (1987); the originator of the first exhibition of Dutch master Judith Leyster (1993); and the first museum to focus its contemporary art programs on art of the last 10 years (1998). The Museum's hours are: Wednesday through Sunday, 11am-5pm, and Saturday 10am-5pm. Admission: FREE for members; Non-members: $8 Adults; $6 Seniors and full-time college students with current ID; FREE for youth 17 and under; FREE for everyone Saturday mornings 10am-noon sponsored by The TJX Companies and Massachusetts Electric Company. For more information, call (508) 799-4406 or visit the Museum at 55 Salisbury Street in Worcester.

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