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  • Kids Make Modern Art in December Workshops at Worcester Art Museum

    (WORCESTER, MASS, NOVEMBER 6, 2001)-Worcester Art Museum has plenty of ideas to tap the creativity and imaginative spirit of children during the December school vacation. In art-making workshops on Dec. 26, 27 and 28, children ages 5-12 will design and build a city, create a futuristic invention, and paint a modern masterpiece.

    The December workshops complement the Worcester Art Museum's special exhibition Modernism & Abstraction: Treasures from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, on view through Jan. 6, 2002. The exhibition spotlights major 20th-century artists-including Georgia O'Keeffe, Helen Frankenthaler, Robert Rauschenberg, David Hockney, and many others-who were passionate about modern life in America. In each of the workshops, children will visit the galleries of Modernism & Abstraction for ideas and inspiration. Then, they will take to the studios to create their own work of art.

    Families may pre-register their children for one, two or all three of these workshops:

    Cityscapes and Skyscrapers
    Wednesday, Dec. 26 (10 a.m.-noon or 12:30-2:30 p.m.)
    Ages 5-12
    In the galleries of Modernism & Abstraction: Treasures from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, children will discover how artists of the 20th century, such as Georgia O'Keeffe, were inspired by innovations in architecture. In the studio, using cardboard and other mixed media, they will create a three-dimensional city with blocks of high-rise buildings, streets and parks.

    Invent It!
    Thursday, Dec. 27 (10 a.m.-noon or 12:30-2:30 p.m.)
    Ages 7-12
    Children will explore American artists' fascination with inventions and scientific discoveries, such as the phonograph, factory machinery, molecule structure, airplanes, and more. Then they will don their inventors' caps to plan and build an invention of their own.

    Make It Modern!
    Friday, Dec. 28 (10 a.m.-noon or 12:30-2:30 p.m.)
    Ages 5-12
    In a tour of the exhibition Modernism & Abstraction, children will survey the lines, shapes, colors and textures found in modern art. After collecting ideas in the galleries, they will head to the studios to paint their own modern masterpiece.

    Each two-hour workshop costs $18 per child ($16 Museum member), and pre-registration is required. Children will be divided into age-appropriate groupings in the workshops. To register for these workshops, or to request a Worcester Art Museum Classes brochure, call (508) 799-4406 ext. 3007.

    Museum Background

    Opened to the public in 1898, the Worcester Art Museum is the second largest art museum in New England. Its exceptional 35,000-piece collection of paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, photography, prints and drawings is displayed in 36 galleries and spans 5,000 years of art and culture, ranging from Egyptian antiquities and Roman mosaics to Impressionist paintings and contemporary art. Throughout its first century, the Worcester Art Museum proved itself a pioneer: the first American museum to purchase work by Claude Monet (1910) and Paul Gauguin (1921); the first museum to bring a medieval building to America (1927); a sponsor of the first major excavation at Antioch, one of the four great cities of ancient Rome (1932); the first museum to create an Art All-State program for high school artists (1987); the originator of the first exhibition of Dutch master Judith Leyster (1993); and the first museum to focus its contemporary art programs on art of the last 10 years (1998). The Museum's hours are: Wednesday through Sunday, 11am-5pm, and Saturday 10am-5pm. Admission: FREE for members; Non-members: $8 Adults; $6 Seniors and full-time college students with current ID; FREE for youth 17 and under; FREE for everyone Saturday mornings 10am-noon sponsored by The TJX Companies and Massachusetts Electric Company. For more information, call (508) 799-4406 or visit the Museum at 55 Salisbury Street in Worcester.

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