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Related Events

Worcester Art Museum

February 23 Wednesday

Teachers Workshop 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

A Lasting Impact on Culture: How the Plague Influenced Science and Art

Kenneth Salins

Members $45

Non-Members $55

Holy Cross

March 30 Wednesday

"Baroque Music for Hope and Healing"
Organized by Carole Lieberman, Music Department

Program includes works by Monteverdi commissioned for Santa Maria della Salute
Brooks Concert Hall.

Free        Open to the Public


Worcester Art Museum

April 2 Saturday

Opening Reception for Hope and Healing 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Worcester Art Museum  Members $10  (Holy Cross and Clark ID’s admitted at Member Price)

Non-Members $20


Worcester Art Museum

April 7 Thursday

Teachers Workshop 12PM-5PM

A Cure for Adversity: Hope During Times of Plague

Kenneth Salins

Members $45

Non-Members $55

Worcester Art Museum

Lecture Series: Hope and Healing In Context

The devastating effects of plague in early modern Europe affected all aspects of life.  Sign up for one session or all five.  Space is limited; registration required. 

Free for Members; $8 non-members. For more information and to reserve a seat please call 508.799.4406 x 3007


Worcester Art Museum

April 7 Thursday

Lecture Series (1) The Historical Record 6:30 PM

Franco Mormando, Exhibition Curator

Discover the wealth of primary source material that feeds our understanding, including the revival of ancient plague stories in a contemporary setting.

Worcester Art Museum

April 17 Sunday

Lecture Series (2) Science of Contagion 2:00 PM

Dr. Richard Glew (Conference Room)

Infectious Disease Specialist,Vice Chair, Department of Medicine

U Mass Medical Center

Delve into the science behind pestilence throughout history in a quest to better understand contemporary issues related to contagion.

Holy Cross

April 23 Saturday

Annual New England Renaissance Conference 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
“Piety and Plague in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe”

Organized by Thomas Worcester (Holy Cross) and Franco Mormando (Boston College)

Rehm Library, College of the Holy Cross

Speakers:


Pamela Berger (Boston College), “The Black Death of 1348 North of the Alps: Text and Image”  
Elina Gertsman (University of Chicago), “Visualizing Death: Medieval Plagues and the Macabre”
Ronald Rittgers (Yale Divinity School), “Protestants and Plague: the Case of the 1562 Pest in Nuremberg”
Thomas Worcester, “Plague as Spiritual Opportunity: Etienne Binet, S.J. (1569-1639)”  
Franco Mormando, “Michael Sweerts’s Plague in an Ancient City (Rome, ca. 1650): Deciphering the Enigma”
Nancy Andrews (College of the Holy Cross), “The Milky Way: The Iconography of Breastfeeding in the Hope and Healing Exhibition and in Ancient Sources”  
Sheila Barker (Independent Scholar), “The Un-Making of a Plague Saint: St. Sebastian in Seventeenth-Century Italian Art”  
The keynote speaker, William Eamon (New Mexico State), “The Canker Friar: Piety and Intrigue in an Era of New Diseases”

For additional information about the program, contact Thomas Worcester (tworcester@holycross.edu) or Franco Mormando (mormando@bc.edu).


Thanks to the generosity of the Office of the Dean, College of the Holy Cross, there is no fee to attend the conference, and a buffet lunch is included for conference attendees.  It is, however, necessary to register for the conference, as seats are limited, and we need a count for lunch.  Registrations are first-come, first served; to register contact the conference secretary, Susan Pfeiffer (spfeiffe@holycross.edu).  Further details on conference venue, parking, and other practical matters will follow as the date approaches. 


Worcester Art Museum

April 28 Thursday

Lecture Series (3) Painting for the Plague 6:30PM
Gauvin Bailey, Exhibition Curator (in the galleries)
Examine the ways in which artists and their patrons utilized painting as a vehicle for coping with the devastation of plague.

Worcester Art Museum

May 5 Thursday

Lecture Series (4) Painting for the Plague 6:30PM
Pamela Jones, Exhibition Curator (in the galleries)
Examine the ways in which artists and their patrons utilized painting as a vehicle for coping with the devastation of plague.

Worcester Art Museum

May 15 Sunday

Lecture Series (5) Religious Culture: Renaissance to Enlightenment 2:00 PM
Thomas Worcester, Exhibition Curator (in the galleries)
It was believed that plague was sent by God as punishment for sins committed, therefore spiritual remedies, prayer and good works, were the only appropriate antidote. Learn the role that religion, specifically the Catholic Church, played in coping with plague.